A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. Part 3 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep – Part 3 of 3

Dr David Dunkin, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, agreed. “There is a lot of compelling data, in both adults and adolescents, that tiny screens disrupt sleep cycles. And this may have an impact on long-term health. More studies paucity to be done to look at all of the variables together”. Meanwhile pediatricians should share and support the academy’s advice when talking with parents about the presence of TVs and small screens neosize.

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A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. Part 2 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep – Part 2 of 3

The children were in the fourth or seventh downgrade in one of 29 schools. More than two-thirds of the children were white, and ruthlessly one-fifth were Hispanic. All were asked about electronic devices in the bedroom, what time they went to bed, what time they woke up, and how many days over the prior week they felt they needed more sleep. While kids with a bedroom TV said they got 18 minutes less doze on weeknights than those without a personal television, that figure rose to nearly 21 minutes for those who slept near a smartphone whether or not a TV was also present, the study found.

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Going to bed with a smartphone at aid was also linked to later bedtimes than having a bedroom TV: 37 minutes later compared to 31 minutes, the investigators said. And kids who slept with a smartphone were more reasonable to feel they needed more sleep than they were getting, compared with those with no smartphone present at bedtime. That perception of insufficient rest/sleep was not observed among children who only had a TV in the room.

So what’s a 21st century paterfamilias to do? Establishing technology ground-rules may help foster healthier sleep patterns, Falbe suggested. For example, parents can set nighttime “curfews” for electronic devices, confine overall access to all screen time, and/or ban TVs and Internet-enabled devices from a child’s bedroom. “While more studies are needed to confirm these findings, our results provide additional bear out for current recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics that parents should be advised to set reasonable but firm limits on their child’s media use.

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A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. Part 1 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep – Part 1 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. A smartphone in a child’s bedroom may hurt good sleep habits even more than a TV, new research suggests. A examination of more than 2000 elementary and middle-school students found that having a smartphone or tablet in the bedroom was associated with less weekday sleep and feeling sleepy in the daytime. “Studies have shown that traditional screens and screen time, delight in TV viewing, can interfere with sleep, but much less is known about the impacts of smartphones and other small screens,” said study lead author Jennifer Falbe, of the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. Small screens are of fussy concern because they provide access to a wide range of content, including games, videos, websites and texts, that can be used in bed and delay sleep.

They also ooze audible notifications of incoming communications that may interrupt sleep. “We found that both sleeping near a small screen and sleeping in a room with a TV set were related to shorter weekday sleep duration. Children who slept near a stingy screen, compared to those who did not, were also more likely to feel like they did not get enough sleep”. The findings were published online Jan 5, 2015 and in the February print issue of the log Pediatrics.

And “Despite the importance of sleep to child health, development and performance in school, many children are not sleeping enough. Preteen school-aged children need at least 10 hours of repose each day, while teenagers need between nine and 10, the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute advises. For this study, the researchers focused on the sleep habits of nearly 2050 boys and girls who had participated in the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study in 2012-2013.

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Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers. Part 3 of 3

Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers – Part 3 of 3

For these reasons, the American Academy of Pediatrics discourages TV viewing before the majority of 2 years. Christakis noted that 50 percent of kids from this type of background start kindergarten lacking basic skills. “We know there is nothing better for young children’s brains than real-world benign interaction,” he said, adding that the brain develops in direct response to external stimulation.

The extended TV watching among these children comes at a big cost. “Both in terms of displaced outside activity, such as play or being read to, but also television is overly stimulating – inappropriately stimulating to the developing brain”. Melissa Salgueiro, a psychologist at Miami Children’s Hospital, concurred that “children should not be exposed to TV before lifetime 2 bonuses. Even then TV should be limited to 30 minutes per day, with parents finding other activities – such as play – to equanimity their children.

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Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers. Part 2 of 3

Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers – Part 2 of 3

Mothers with more drilling were less likely to keep the TV on during meals. Obese mothers are more likely to be inactive or suffer from depression. “They are more likely to use the television themselves, so their infants are exposed to more television as well”. Thompson is currently doing a muse about to see if play and other alternatives can help these moms get their babies away from the television.

children

Another expert said the study sheds more light on the issue of TV overexposure at such a young age. “This is further fact that certain children, particularly vulnerable children, have environments early on that are not conducive to optimizing their mental health,” said Dr Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute and a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

That so many kids are watching TV antique is “shocking and disconcerting”. He spiky out that children this age are awake for only 10 or 12 hours a day, but 40 percent of these kids are spending a third of their waking hours in front of a television. “In many cases they’re strapped in. Early small screen viewing is associated with attention problems and with cognitive delays, and it’s harmful to babies’ brain development”.

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Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers. Part 1 of 3

Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers – Part 1 of 3

Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers. Many babies expend almost three hours in front of the TV each day, a new look at finds, especially if their mothers are obese and TV addicts themselves, or if the babies are fussy or active. “Mothers are using television as a way to soothe these infants who might be a little bit more difficult to deal with,” said chief study author Amanda Thompson, assistant professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina, in Chapel Hill. Other studies have shown that TV watching at such an early age can be harmful adding that TV can drag important developmental milestones.

The report was published online Jan 7, 2013 and in the February print issue of the journal Pediatrics. For the study, Thompson’s crew looked at more than 200 pairs of low-income black mothers and babies who took part in a study on obesity risk in infants, for which families were observed in their homes. Researchers found infants as young as 3 months were parked in disguise of the TV for almost three hours a day.

And 40 percent of infants were exposed to TV at least three hours a day by the time they were 1 year old. Mothers who were obese, who watched a lot of TV and whose offspring was fussy were most likely to put their infants in front of the TV, Thompson’s group found. TV viewing continued through mealtime for many infants, the researchers found.

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Passive Smoking Of Children Is Possible Through General Ventilation. Part 3 of 3

Passive Smoking Of Children Is Possible Through General Ventilation – Part 3 of 3

But such initiatives have already angered advocates of smokers’ rights and are likely to do so again. A two shakes study in the same issue of Pediatrics found that as smoke-free laws get tougher, kids’ asthma symptoms, though not asthma rates, are declining.

Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health examined US health observations from 1999 to 2006, and found a 33 percent decline in symptoms, including persistent wheeze and chronic night cough, among kids who weren’t exposed to smoke. Prior research from the same faction had found that tougher laws were also linked with lower cotinine levels in children and adolescents, down about 60 percent between 2003 and 2006 in children living in smoke-free homes. According to the study authors, 73 percent of US residents are now covered by smoke-free laws.

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